Buddy - Courtesy Posting





We are thrilled that Buddy captured the hearts of his rescuers and he will remain with them. Here is what they said:

We have not had any response and that was what we felt would happen. We have decided to keep him here with us and continue on his recovery. He is gaining weight and filling out nicely. He is a happy boy now and play is back in his life.

He is doing awesome and we feel his condition isn't as bad as some dogs suffer from. He is one of the
smartest dogs I have ever had the privilage to meet. This decision was made based on his care and how much he has grown on us.

Thank you for your help and your time spent trying to help us.

Everything happens for a reason so we will enjoy everyday as it comes and I am sure he will, as well.

He has to sit on the cooler beside me because it's closer to me. Lucy is our girl in the back of one of the pic's

Buddy is a courtesy posting.

Buddy was posted as a ‘free dog’ when Randy rescued him. He was in very bad shape He is three and a half years old and weighs 58lb.

His nails had grown around back into his pads, had infected ears and needed cleaning up since he was covered in dried food and feces.

He is house trained and spent the first week at a rescue kennel up here but they had no more room so I am acting as a foster care for him at present.

He is the smartest dog Randy has ever had the pleasure of having.

He has megaesophagus (http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/10/29/megaesophagus-disorder.aspx). This is an eating disorder where the esophagus is enlarged and the muscles allowing him to swallow do not function properly. Unlike in other cases of this kind, he does not vomit his food back up. He needs to eat several small meals a day and he needs to be in an upright position when eating. His water dish also needs to be on a raised platform.

X-rays and blood work have been done. Everything is fine.

He is a friendly boy and loves everyone he meets even at the general store. He is friendly with other dogs. He is gentle and calm.

Buddy is presently underweight. He will not be neutered until he gains weight.

In short, here are some of the things to be expected from a Pyr:

They are beautiful dogs with great temperaments given the right breeding, socialization, care including diet and training.

If you want a pup, always talk to a reputable breeder. That is, a breeder whose dogs are registered with a recognized kennel club, who will interview you thoroughly, allow you to see where the dogs live and the pups with their mother. A breeder will only breed their bitches two maybe three times in their lifetime. They will followup with you to ensure you have neutered and spayed your dog.

They require a good weekly grooming with a slicker brush and comb to keep them mat free and their skin healthy (hence, pain free from the pulling of mats as they move), and cutting their nails including their dew claws every couple of weeks to a month.They molt twice a year and all year round so your vacuum stays full. NEVER shave a Pyr. Their double coats keep them cool in summer and warm in winter.

Their instinct it to wander. Therefore, they require at least a 6-foot secure fence in a large yard in which they can play, run and watch over. No tie outs for these guys. It can lead to aggression since they cannot fully watch over their territory. If they are out all day, as they usually prefer, they need shelter from the elements and fresh water.

They bark more than most dogs and neighbours do complain. That is a common reason for people surrendering their Pyrs (they didn't do their research). Their bark is what deters predators and it is instinct to them. That and marking their territory. To take away their bark is to take away who they are. The barking can be managed but it takes time, patience and consistency with positive-reinforcement training.

They dig holes in your garden to stay cool in summer.

They require a lot of socialization as pups onward with people and other dogs. They also require positive-reinforcement training (a trainer who shows you how to work with a clicker). Pyrs, nor any dogs, take kindly to any kind of punishment. It will lead to aggression.

It's important to work with the dogs as if in a dance and you are leading. Rewards for good behaviour and redirect for unwanted behaviour. It's up to you to make them a good canine citizen. When engaging a trainer, ensure they use positive-reinforcement training and show you how to manage your dog. Never send a dog away for training. You are the one working with the dog, not a trainer.

To train a Pyr is not like training some other dogs. They are not eager-to-please and just as soon walk away from you than do as you say. They have been used for years as guardian livestock dogs because they do not require human intervention to tell them how to do their job. Lots of patience, consistency and time is required to work with them. If you want an obedient dog, this is not the dog for you.

They require regular walks, of course, so they get out and see the world. They must be leashed because they will wander. Again, because they are so good at wandering they have been used to wander with sheep as they watch over them.

There are those in need of a home because someone didn't realize they would get so big, bark so much, leave so much hair in the house, wander, and require work. Or, they ended up going to a backyard breeder or farmer and ended up with a dog who was aggressive because of bad breeding. Or, they forgot they travel a lot or a baby is on the way and they just don't want the dog, anymore.

It is very important to do your research on any breed before deciding if they are a good match for your family. Please start here:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Great-Pyrenees.html

We never want to see these dogs fail so it's important that children learn how to behave with dogs and that parents never leave their children alone with a dog. Here is a link on that subject:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/bestdogsforchildren.html

If you are interested in Buddy and think you would make a good match for him, please contact Randy at brenda_randy@ntl.sympatico.ca.

Fill out the adoption application if you are interested in Buddy. http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Dog-Adoption-Form.html



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