companion

Are Great Pyrs good for people that suffer PTSD or just need a pet to love on? I get stressed when in big groups.

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Apr 21, 2015
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companion
by: Susan

I am not sure they would be good for people with PTSD. Because they are pretty well always on guard, they can have a tendency to suddenly jump up barking loudly while you are relaxing watching TV, or when you are sleeping, and startle you. So if loud noises bother you, this would not be the right dog for you. And they are very protective and alert to your emotions and anything they feel may be a threat to you. I think perhaps a Newfoundland dog may be a better choice.

Apr 21, 2015
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Stressed
by: Dona

Almost any dog would be good for helping with stress.

Make sure to do your research on which dog you want before choosing. Pyrs do bark more than other dogs as they are guardian dogs who bark to warn away predators. Neighbours do not appreciate it but it can be managed in many cases.

They have two big sheds a year along with daily shedding so lots of hair in the house.

They dig holes in the garden/lawn to stay cool in the summer.

They are not eager-to-please dogs who dog things on their own time. This is why they are used as guardian livestock dogs.They are independent thinkers and do the job without having a human tell them how.

They need weekly grooming, exercise and training like any dog.

Again, do your research.

Apr 21, 2015
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Companion
by: Jean Lodge

A Pyr is wonderful to hug and love. Moreover, a Pyr is a guardian and perhaps will make you feel safer with your PTSD. I don't have PTSD but I have had some very difficult situations, including the prolonged dying of my mother almost 20 years ago due to extremely painful cancer, and my Pyr was there for me when I needed to hug him and just cry.

You can lose your soul in your Pyr when you need to. I've had other difficult situations that happened when I had different Pyrs over a 25-year-period and, every single time, my Pyr was there for me when I needed comfort.

As long as you understand the nature of the breed and what you must do for a Pyr (which includes socializing your Pyr), I think you will find that a Pyr will be extremely helpful for you. I wish you the best.

Apr 25, 2015
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best match for person with PTSD?
by: Tressie

As a former counsellor who has worked with people with PTSD, whether or not a Pyr is a good match for you is entirely dependent on your individual personality as much as that of the dog's. Clearly, dogs are individuals as well but there are some traits inherent in Pyrs that have already been mentioned that may not make them suitable for someone with PTSD.

For example, a lot of people with PTSD have a strong startle reflex. If you are someone who is especially sensitive to sounds, a dog with a resounding, booming bark that can be set off at the drop of a hat is probably not a good choice.

Pyrs are independent and while they are affectionate, are not as a rule, cuddle bugs, nor are they velcro dogs. If you are looking for a snuggle bunny, one of the smaller breeds who have been bred specifically as lapdogs might be a better choice. However, these dogs need you as much as you need them, and don't do well left on their own.

Larger dogs, who are utterly devoted to their owners but are exclusively one-person dogs are breeds like the Akita or Chow. Those are the extremes! If you don't want a truly independent dog, nor are comfortable with a velcro dog, nor a dog who is exclusively loyal to you but wary of everyone else - then a compromise might be a friendly mutt, perhaps a lab mix.

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