Is a secure fenced yard essential when dog is a constant companion to owner?

We are building a home on an acre of land that unfortunately does not allow fences (strata). The island has a population of about 3500 people (there are a couple Pyrs on island already : ) It is a lovely quiet place to live with many hiking trails through wooded areas.

I will be the primary caregiver. I am a stay at home mom to one young gentle son and will be working part time from home. Our future dog will be my constant companion with a lengthy (1-2 hour) walk every morning and a shorter walk (30-60mins) in the evenings. I understand that Pyrs ideally need a fenced in yard to avoid the tendency to roam, but when the dog is a true constant companion and is virtually never left, is this still necessary? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you, Connie

Comments for Is a secure fenced yard essential when dog is a constant companion to owner?

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Nov 15, 2015
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Fencing
by: Donna

If you don't want him to wander, you will need fencing.

Yes, he will adore you but his instinct is to check out any territory available to him. He will come back eventually but there is the possibility of being hit by a car, bothering people, not getting along with another dog and whatever other trouble that can happen out there.

What about a dog run when you aren't outside with him?

He sounds like he is lucky to have you as his companion.

Nov 15, 2015
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short and sweet
by: Anonymous

This is easy you let him out without a leash and he is going to roam. I promise
He will love you to death, mine and as my service dog and was trained beyond most but I never ever let him out without a leash. You can't undo 5000 year of roaming it is in there DNA. Why would you even take a chance with you baby.

Nov 17, 2015
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Wandering Pyr
by: Mike

It is in their nature to patrol their boundaries. Once accustomed to a boundary they continually expand on it. Give them 1 acre they assume 10. Give them 10 acres they assume 100. Respectively they are bred with NO FEAR therefore hard to instill street smarts!

Nov 20, 2015
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Would not let him out on his own.
by: Anonymous

Hi there and thanks for all of your feedback. Sorry I should have been more clear. As much of our time (2 - 3 hours a day) will be spent outside regardless of weather....the rest of the time he would be with me (us) indoors. He would not be out on his own at all. I agree, I would never take this chance. A dog run could be an idea....for me, I think I'd just rather be with him.

And thanks for your lovely comment. It is appreciated. I'd feel very lucky to have one of these majestic animals for a companion and he'd be treated with great care. I'm 42 and I've been wanting a GP since I was 17yrs. This is the first time I've found myself in an living situation where I'm sure a GP could be happy . I'm hoping it works out. My concern is that it doesn't appear I'm able to adopt a rescue without visible fencing. This seems to be a requirement. I'd very much like to adopt as opposed to purchase. I am not interested in showing or breeding. Just loving : )

Nov 20, 2015
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Re - Secured Fencing
by: Anonymous

Hello I responded before but don't see it posted so I'll give it another go.

Sorry for the confusion, I should have clarified. If the dog is outside I will be with him. There will be a ton of daily outdoor time as that is the wonderful nature of living on a sparsely populated beautiful island! I would never have the dog roam outside on his own. As mentioned, that is a chance I too would never take.

Also, to the person who first responded, thank you for the lovely comment. I am 42 and have wanted a GP since I was 17 years old. This is the first time in my life I feel that I am living in a home where we could give one a really beautiful life as these majestic creatures deserve nothing less.

My concern is that I will be unable to adopt. I'd much prefer to adopt than purchase. I have no interest in breeding or showing or any of that type of thing. We just want a GP who will be part of our family that we can love.

Thank to you all for your feedback. Any and all comments are appreciated.

Connie

Nov 26, 2015
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Connie's dream
by: Anonymous

My dear, the thing you must remember about any Pyrenees is that their middle name is always "Disa-Pyr". No matter how carefully you watch over him when outside, he will watch YOU so much more acutely than you are even aware of. He'll look as if he's laying down asleep, but their awareness goes way far beyond "seeing". This is his nature, to be totally aware as your guardian. The tiniest moment you take your eyes off him when outside(and you will)*poof*....Disa-Pyr! You will not even see him go but will hear his big voice in the distance telling the world he is there, and he is on patrol. If there are other Pyrs anywhere within 50 miles or so he may be tempted to hook up with them.

It is also in their long lineage as guardians of a flock, for Pyrs to work together. So he will seek this. But this could end in disaster for your baby, and I would not risk this if I were you.

However, there are always exceptions. If you can adopt an adult Pyr, its character will be established and given time, therefore a bit easier to read. If you adopt a pup, there is no question he will bond to you and will want to be with you, but that will always be on his terms. By the time you become aware this is the case he will be at least 2yrs. old already, and the love of your life.

Your best bet, other than a long leash, is a roomy dog run bolted to the strata. But remember he will climb, dig, jump or destroy any fence you can dream up if he has a mind to. Many, many Pyr families have a run for their dogs as we do also. This, in combination of 2 pack walks every day with all our dogs together(without fail, no matter the weather)and on a leash, has worked well in our family.

We also keep our dogs indoors at night when the urge to wander is the strongest. Do also add a second canine companion for play, if you can, and your life with your Pyr will be wonderful. Fabulous. Your dream a reality.

I have no doubt after reading your posting the Pyr who becomes your companion will have a great life. And lastly, if you have not already, do read the Pyrenees stories section on this site. Especially the stories of Frankie and her family, and the guardian Pyrenees in use to protect forestry personnel in remote locations.
Good luck!

Dec 07, 2015
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Wandering
by: Donna

Invisible fencing is not acceptable for a Pyr, unfortunately. They will go through it. Some will even scare themselves enough that they will be too scared to go back outside.

Even if you are outside with the dog, they will still wander. You will need to keep an eye on him all the time. Note that they are not eager-to-please and their listening skills are nil if they decide they don't have time for you.

Dec 08, 2015
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To anonymous - thank you!
by: Connie

Hello and thanks so much for your comments! It appears a dog run is the best option, glad to know it's worked well for you. Whatever is best for our future GP is what we will do. I have read the stories on this site...just amazing. We are still about a year out from our home being ready to move in and plan on spending a chunk of that time doing even further research. There are 2 wonderful dog training/kennel/lovefest farms for dogs here on bowen should there ever be a need to utilize them. This is a dog loving island....Our business partners moved there three years ago....and now they are a three dog family! (tho i do get that GPs are unique and their "training" often looks very different to what's typical).

I mentioned in a previous post, there is a man who's currently the proud owner of two GPs on the island. Lovely man he is, he has been open to me spending time with his boys and learning more about them in a hands on way.... So thankful this opportunity is available to me/us.

As I have a young son, I think an adult dog would be the best decision. I'd like to already know the temperament.....in my view, when you take on an animal, it's forever. So I think it's very important to ensure it's the right fit.....for the family.....but also of course equally important for the GP.

It is only fair to ensure they are being introduced to a home where they are set up for a wonderful life that is compatible for who they already are. (plus, pups are easier to place, but adults need a loving home just as much! every animal I've ever lived with has been one I've picked up off the street....been doing it since I was wee much to my Mums dismay)

Thanks again for your feedback. I'm excited but aware that I really need to be prepared in order to do right by the GP we adopt. Any/all tips and suggestions to help with that are so appreciated.

Dec 08, 2015
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Thanks Donna
by: Anonymous

Hi Donna- appreciate the info on invisible fencing....someone explained it to me and it wasn't something I felt comfortable with at all....felt like I would be tasering my dog when he (literally) stepped out of line! Good to have the confirmation on that one.

Is a dog run without fencing is a realistic option? We definitely would have an ideal and ample space for it on the property....would have both shade and sun.....that choice is always a nice one to have. Would love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks again!

Dec 09, 2015
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Fencing
by: Donna

I assumed you already had the Pyr. It's unfortunate you are unable to put up fencing. He won't be able to patrol his property.

Please, yes, do your research.Here's a good place to start:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Great-Pyrenees.html

It's also very important to read about dogs and children:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/bestdogsforchildren.html

They are beautiful which is why people get them but they didn't do their research.

They bark more than most dogs as this is instinct to them to fend off predators. Neighbours complain and they have to surrender the dog. They molt twice a year and all year so your vacuum stays full. They love to dig in the garden to stay cool in summer and warm in winter. They are not eager-to-please dogs so if you want an obedient dog, this is not the one for you. They need weekly grooming to keep the coat mat-free and healthy. Nails and dew claws must be trimmed every two weeks to a month. They are independent thinkers and this is why they are used as guardian dogs. No human needs to tell them how to do their job.

Best of luck!

Dec 10, 2015
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gp
by: Anonymous

Hi I'm just now reading this me and my family have a gp and she is an inside dog we don't have a fence and she does just fine of course she is only 6 months but she has done great we thought it wouldn't work with all the excersise they need but it works perfectly.

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