Lilly

Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly

Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly

Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly
Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly
Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly
Great Pyrenees Rescue Lilly

We are happy to announce Lilly has officially been adopted.

Lilly had been running wild on a family’s farm with other dogs. They did nothing with her. They asked a neighbour, her previous family, to take her.

They did much work with her including house training. She did very well with them but, as with any dog who has not been handled and well-socialized in the first 13 weeks of life, she takes awhile to warm up to new people. She is not aggressive but fearful.

Over time, she became a sweet responsive dog. And, she has become this way with her foster family.

She needs ongoing work in this regard. Lilly is distrusting and nervous around new people but has never shown aggression. She has fear. She will get better with much patience and time.

Her people had to surrender her due to a change in family circumstances.

She is good with dogs but can be unsure of them. She is good with cats.
Lilly was born April 2014. She weighs 50 pounds.

Lilly needs a securely fenced yard of at least 5 feet.

They require a good weekly grooming with a slicker brush and comb to keep them mat free and their skin healthy (hence, pain free from the pulling of mats as they move), and cutting their nails including their dew claws every couple of weeks to a month.They molt twice a year and all year round so your vacuum stays full. NEVER shave a Pyr. Their double coats keep them cool in summer and warm in winter.

Their instinct it to wander. Therefore, they require at least a 5-foot secure fence in a large yard in which they can play, run and watch over. No tie outs for these guys. It can lead to aggression since they cannot fully watch over their territory. If they are out all day, as they usually prefer, they need shelter from the elements.

They bark more than most dogs and neighbours do complain. That is a common reason for people surrendering their Pyrs (they didn't do their research). Their bark is what deters predators and it is instinct to them. That and marking their territory. To take away their bark is to take away who they are. The barking can be managed but it takes time, patience and consistency with positive-reinforcement training.

They dig holes in your garden to stay cool in summer.

They require a lot of socialization as pups onward with people and other dogs. They also require positive-reinforcement training (a trainer who shows you how to work with a clicker). Pyrs, nor any dogs, take kindly to any kind of punishment. It will lead to aggression.

It's important to work with the dogs as if in a dance and you are leading. Rewards for good behaviour and redirect for unwanted behaviour. It's up to you to make them a good canine citizen. When engaging a trainer, ensure they use positive-reinforcement training and show you how to manage your dog. Never send a dog away for training. You are the one working with the dog, not a trainer.

To train a Pyr is not like training some other dogs. They are not eager-to-please and just as soon walk away from you than do as you say. They have been used for years as guardian livestock dogs because they do not require human intervention to tell them how to do their job. Lots of patience, consistency and time is required to work with them. If you want an obedient dog, this is not the dog for you.

They require regular walks, of course, so they get out and see the world. They must be leashed because they will wander. Again, because they are so good at wandering they have been used to wander with sheep as they watch over them.

There are those in need of a home because someone didn't realize they would get so big, bark so much, leave so much hair in the house, wander, and require work. Or, they ended up going to a backyard breeder or farmer and ended up with a dog who was aggressive because of bad breeding. Or, they forgot they travel a lot or a baby is on the way and they just don't want the dog, anymore.

It is very important to do your research on any breed before deciding if they are a good match for your family. If you haven’t already, please start here:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Great-Pyrenees.html

We never want to see these dogs fail so it's important that children learn how to behave with dogs and that parents never leave their children alone with a dog. Here is a link on that subject:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/bestdogsforchildren.html

In order to meet Lilly, please fill out an adoption application http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Dog-Adoption-Form.html

There is a $350 adoption donation for Lilly.

If you think you are a good match for Miss Lilly, please contact Craig at craigsibley57@gmail.com

Comments for Lilly

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Feb 05, 2016
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About your Lilly
by: Anonymous

About your Lilly

Lilly looks more like a golden retriever than a treat Pyrenees. My golden of 11 years is the carbon copy of Lilly in color,and head, except he is a male and larger with a tick coat. Lilly's coat looks thin. She looks good.

Jan 22, 2016
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LILLY
by: Trish

We would like to learn a bit more about her. We rescued Bella from this group and love her so much. We had a Bernese we lost last year and she misses him. Lily could be just what Bella needs!

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