pyrenees

by kim mcdade
(buford, ga)

can pyrenees be inside dog . would exercise in evening and outside in fenced in yard during the day .

Comments for pyrenees

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Apr 04, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Pyr Information
by: Donna

Pyrs can be inside but they also need to be able to go outside as they please. They need their walks to stay stimulated and a securely fenced yard of at least 5-feet. Make sure to do your research on this breed as they are not the breed for most people. Here is a summary on the breed.

Crate-training is the best thing you can do for your puppy or even a more mature dog. Of course, you do not leave puppy for dog in there for hours on end. They have tiny bladders. Puppy would stay in there at night and when you are not home. Again, you can only leave puppy in their for maybe three hours at the most. When you get home, take puppy outside immediately to relieve himself.

The crate keeps pup/dog safe from chewing on things he shouldn't and that could harm him. It is his safe place when he wants to get away from the hustle and bustle. Make sure he has some toys in there and a raw bone on which to chew

Before he ever goes in it, make sure he has had enough play time and exercise to sleep. In fact, you can train them through repetition to 'go to your house' and they happily go in there while you leave the house for a short period or go to bed.

NEVER use it as punishment. Never punish dogs. Always use positive-reinforcement training.

In short, here are some of the things to be expected from a Pyr:

They are beautiful dogs with great temperaments given the right breeding, socialization, care including diet and training.

They require a good weekly grooming to keep them mat free and their skin healthy (hence, pain free from the pulling of mats as they move), and cutting their nails including their dew claws every couple of weeks to a month. If you do not do this, the nails will grow into their pads and be extremely painful.

They molt twice a year and all year round so your vacuum stays full. NEVER shave a Pyr. Their double coats keep them cool in summer and warm in winter. If you don't like grooming, take your dog to a master groomer.

Their instinct it to wander. Therefore, they require at least a 6-foot secure fence in a large yard in which they can play, run and watch over. No tie outs for these guys. It can lead to aggression since they cannot fully watch over their territory. If they are out all day, as they usually prefer, they need shelter from the elements.

They bark more than most dogs and neighbours do complain. That is a common reason for people surrendering their Pyrs (they didn't do their research). Their bark is what deters predators and it is instinct to them. That and marking their territory. To take away their bark is to take away who they are. The barking can be managed but it takes time, patience and consistency with positive-reinforcement training. If you don't like barking, they are not the dog for you.

They dig holes in your garden to stay cool in summer.

They require a lot of socialization as pups onward with people and other dogs. They also require positive-reinforcement training (a trainer who shows you how to work with a clicker). Pyrs, nor any dogs, take kindly to any kind of punishment. It will lead to aggression. Dr. Sophia Yin is a great website resource.

It's important to work with the dogs as if in a dance and you are leading. Rewards for good behaviour and redirect for unwanted behaviour. It's up to you to make them a good canine citizen. When engaging a trainer, ensure they use positive-reinforcement training and show you how to manage your dog. Never send a dog away for training. You are the one working with the dog, not a trainer.

To train a Pyr is not like training some other dogs. They are not eager-to-please and just as soon walk away from you than do as you say. They were bred by man to be used as guardian livestock dogs because they do not require human intervention to tell them how to do their job. Lots of patience, consistency and time is required to work with them. If you want an obedient dog, this is not the dog for you.

They require regular walks, of course, so they get out and see the world. They must be leashed because they will wander. Again, because they are so good at wandering they have been used to wander with sheep as they watch over them. It's suggested to use a front lead harness which will cut down on any damage to the spine should the dog pull although, with a little work from puppyhood, they should be good on a leash.

There are those in need of a home because someone didn't realize they would get so big, bark so much, leave so much hair in the house, wander, and require work. Or, they ended up going to a backyard breeder or farmer and ended up with a dog who was aggressive because of bad breeding. Or, they forgot they travel a lot or a baby is on the way and they just don't want the dog, anymore.

It is very important to do your research on any breed before deciding if they are a good match for your family. Please start here:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/Great-Pyrenees.html

Regarding dogs and children. We never want to see these dogs fail so it's important that children learn how to behave with dogs and that parents never leave their children alone with a dog. Here is a link on that subject:

http://www.great-pyrenees-club-of-southern-ontario.com/bestdogsforchildren.html

Apr 05, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Great PYR could be house dog with lots of patience
by: Nashville

WE have a 2.5 year old rescue. He is kind of small and has a very sweet nature. It was a long road (almost 6 months) to get him acclimated to living in a city house on .25 acres. However, he gets a morning walk and and evening walk and several times a week we get a college student to take him on long walks. We visit Grandma and he is so sweet to the residents there. I am not into daycare but the student has been wonderful and worth every penny.

You also need to find the right kind of trainer. Someone who has worked with the breed to help him from being so self willed. Super dog and worth the year to find him. Loves to be petted and is so kind to everyone.


Apr 05, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Extra supplies
by: Ed A from NJ

There are a few small adjustment you need to make when getting your Pyrenees to be inside. My Beau and now Maximoose are inside dogs and for the most part are very good once they make the two year old mark and calm down a little. You need to by a new rake which you will need for inside use, you will use this on the rugs very lightly to pick up most of the hair before sending in your pet vaccum in order to save your vaccum. I learned this trick only after i brought my second dyson in for repairs to be unclogged with pure hair. You will need a large Matt for under the water bowl and a sponge mop for the ceiling just over the water bowl for excessive head shaking and flying water after he drinks (in general the male's can fling water further then the females). You will need to visit Walmart to buy a couple dozen cheap bundles of wash cloths. One should be stratigicly place in each room the pups will be allowed for drool maintenance when friends are over so his mouth don't leave water spots on there cloths when he plants his face in there lap. Never ever open the frig when the dog is with in two rooms of the frig or you will find hair in the butter and your rather large dog with his nose in the door.Now I know some of this sounds tounge in cheek funny but these tips will really help. Last forget wearing black, white is your new favorite color even after memorial day. One last thing before you wonder if it is worth it let me assure you. Not only it is but with in a couple weeks you forget your doing it and even your fussiest friends get mad at you when you try to keep him out of the room do as not to soil them. Because they can't believe how much they love him to. Hell my friends even grab the drool cloth thems LFS as they come in and call for Maximoose.

Apr 06, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
My dog doesn't drool
by: Nashville

It's funny, but my Pyr doesn't drool and since he gets a really good brushing once a week, the inside of house is pretty good. We do have a super high end vacuum though. A house is not a home unless it has pet hair. The bunny outside used a lot of Russell's hair for its nest. (They had to be relocated, however).

Apr 06, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Training tips
by: Ed A from NJ

As to training you really want a trainer who not only believes in positive reinforcement training but is going to train you as to how to train your dog. With this breed it is super important for your Pyrenees to know you are his teammate not your trainer. I think this breed is very sensitive and loves to be "a good boy" I find giving them a ton of love, talking to them as you would your 3 hear old son and rewarding good behavior is the key. If you get this dog to love you and the family all her will want to be is with you.He will love you and want to please you. If you can nuture that relationship you are half way there.

Apr 09, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Yes, our Pyr is sensitive
by: Nashville

Our Pyr gets very sad when he thinks were are being tough with him. It's like "You don't have to be that way with me." On the other hand, we just failed a pet therapy audition because I was considered not aggressive enough with him. He would make a super pet therapy dog.

Apr 11, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Training
by: Donna

It makes me sad to think anyone would be aggressive when working with any animal.

Pyrs are intelligent animals. They don't need human intervention when doing their instinctive job of watching over livestock.

Work with them. Positive-reinforcement training only. Why would you punish a dog for doing something you don't want him to do? Does this make people feel powerful? To me, it shows great weakness that people cannot work with the intelligence of animals. It shows how inferior we are. Dogs don't come into the world knowing how to be good canine citizens. We have to teach them.

It's important to show the dog what you want from him by praise for good behaviour (e.g., he lies down when you are eating at the table) and redirect for unwanted behaviour (e.g., trade cheese (or something of higher value) for something he has that you don't want him to have, for example).

Here is an excellent article on the Pyr:

http://jaderrobedience.blogspot.ca/2014/09/whats-in-breed.html

Here is someone from whom we humans can learn a great deal on how to work with our dogs:

https://drsophiayin.com/

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Great Pyrenees Questions.








Breaking News

  1. Moose - Courtesy Posting with Kingston Humane Society

    Jul 25, 17 08:15 AM

    *ADOPTED* *NOTE WE WILL BRING MOOSE INTO RESCUE ONCE WE CAN SECURE A FOSTER IF HE HAS NOT BEEN ADOPTED OUT BEFORE THEN* Moose is a 120lb Pyr who is neutered

    Read More

  2. Separation Anxiety

    Jul 24, 17 05:53 AM

    Our Great Pyr Odin has really bad separation anxiety and we would like to work with him and make it better. Any tips?

    Read More

  3. Milos new walk thing carry a stuffed toy in his mouth

    Jul 21, 17 02:02 PM

    When Milo walks he has a new walk thing. He has to carry a small stuffed toy in his mouth. If no stuffed toy he tries to take the leash in his mouth.

    Read More

  4. Milo adjusting to grief , doing well.

    Jul 21, 17 02:01 PM

    Milo no longer carries kings collar around in his mouth. Which is a good thing a sign of feeling better. He has begun to perk up and act more usual ,

    Read More

  5. Belle (now Lily)

    Jul 20, 17 05:37 AM

    *ADOPTED* Belle is a very sweet girl of two years old. She has spent her short life tied out in a yard. We don’t have any other information on her right

    Read More

  6. Amazing story

    Jul 20, 17 05:35 AM

    I loved reading about this dog and what she was willing to do to protect her flock. I am about to get my first after many years of wanting one. I can't

    Read More

  7. Martingale harness

    Jul 20, 17 05:31 AM

    We will be volunteering as a team soon at a hospital. I can't seem to find a martingale harness that is padded below and a handle above. Any suggestions

    Read More

  8. Jack guards Tim

    Jul 19, 17 05:15 AM

    My Great Pyrenees, Jack, who died 3/1/2014 at 11 years was always amazing me. After taking a roommate into my home my dog, Jack changed his nightly routine.

    Read More