Zeus - Courtesy Posting





Zeus is a lovely sweet one year and eight month old male at about 100 pounds. He has no issues other than being a young pup.

He is quite rambunctious and will leap on people. It won’t take much to stop the jumping. He is just full of beans. A simple turning away from and ignoring him if it is seen he will jump. Once he is back on the ground, turn and tell him what a good boy he is. This takes some repetition until he understands. Bring in a positive-reinforcement trainer to help you learn how to manage him.

He needs someone to spend time with him and have patience.

That said, he may be a good working dog. With proper introduction to his livestock, he should adapt well.

If he goes as a companion dog, he must have an active family with children over 16 years of age; he’ll do well to go on regular hikes and, as with any dog, be a part of the family.

Make sure you are able to handle any vet emergencies.

They are beautiful dogs with great temperaments given the right breeding, socialization, care including diet and training. Dogs are a lifelong commitment.

BARKING: They bark more than most dogs and neighbours do complain. That is a common reason for people surrendering their Pyrs (they didn’t do their research). Their bark is what deters predators and it is instinct to them. That and marking their territory. To take away their bark is to take away who they are. The barking can be managed but it takes time, patience and consistency with positive-reinforcement training. If you don’t like barking, they are not the dog for you.

CONTAINMENT: Pyrs love to hang out outside and their instinct is to wander. Therefore, they require at least a 5-foot secure fence in a large yard in which they can play, run and watch over. Some have been know to scale any height of fencing. No tie outs for these guys. It can lead to aggression since they cannot fully watch over their territory. If they are out all day (when you are home), as they usually prefer, they need shelter from the elements. And, no electric collars or invisible fencing.

DIGGING: They dig holes in your garden to stay cool in summer so you’ll want to set aside some garden for them.

DIET: It is important, just as it is for us, to eat a healthy diet for a dog to feel and look his best. Raw is the species-appropriate diet. Here is a some information.

EXERCISE: They require regular walks, of course, so they get out and see the world. They must be leashed because they will wander. Again, they have been specifically bred to wander with sheep as they watch over them. It’s suggested to use a front lead harness which will cut down on any damage to the spine should the dog pull although, with a little training, they will be good on a leash.

GROOMING: Working and companion dogs must be groomed. They require a good weekly grooming to keep them mat free and their skin healthy (hence, pain free from the pulling of mats as they move), and cutting their nails including their dew claws, front and back, every couple of weeks to a month. NEVER have their dew claws removed. This is a barbaric practice. Simply keep the dews trimmed.

They molt twice a year and all year round so your vacuum stays full. NEVER shave a Pyr. Their coats keep them cool in summer–they lose their undercoat, leaving just guard hairs–the guard hairs protect your dog from sunburn and insulate him against heat, as well as allowing air to circulate to keep the skin cool–and warm in winter–their undercoat grows close to the skin to keep your dog warm and dry. This system only works if you groom your dog regularly. If you don’t like grooming, take your dog to a master groomer. If you don’t want to, this isn’t the dog for you.

TRAINING: They require a lot of socialization as pups onward with people and other dogs. They also require positive-reinforcement training (a trainer who shows you how to work with a clicker). Pyrs, nor any dogs, take kindly to any kind of punishment. Always use positive-reinforcement training.It will lead to aggression. Dr. Sophia Yin is a great website resource.

It’s important to work with the dogs as if in a dance and you are leading. Rewards for good behaviour and redirect for unwanted behaviour. It’s up to you to make them a good canine citizen. When engaging a trainer, ensure they use positive-reinforcement training to show you how to manage your dog. Never send a dog away for training. You are the one working with the dog, not a trainer. If you are not ready to train a dog, this is not the dog for you.

To train a Pyr is not like training some other dogs. They are not eager-to-please and just as soon walk away from you than do as you say. They were bred by man to be used as guardian livestock dogs because they do not require human intervention to tell them how to do their job. Lots of patience, consistency and time is required to work with them. If you want an obedient dog, this is not the dog for you.

WHY ARE THEY SURRENDERED:There are those in need of a home because someone didn’t realize they would get so big, bark so much, leave so much hair in the house, wander, and require work. There are also those whom people want to surrender for aggression but we do not take those dogs in. These dogs usually come from farmers, backyard breeders and pet shops (puppy mills) where genetics are unknown by the ‘breeders’ and by the time they start to mature, aggression will set in. Please start here:

Great Pyrenees Club of Southern Ontario

We never want to see these dogs fail so it's important that children learn how to behave with dogs and that parents never leave their children alone with a dog. Here is a link on that subject:

Best Dogs for Children



If you are interested in meeting Zeus, please contact Steve at 289-456-2929.

Comments for Zeus - Courtesy Posting

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Contact information at bottom of post
by: Great Pyrenees Club

You'll need to contact the person listed at the bottom of the posting in order to meet Zeus.

Meeting sues
by: Brag GuestAnonymous

Good afternoon!!! My wife and I are currently pyr parents of our second fantastic pyr!!! We are considering adopting a new addition to our familly!!! Our current pyr is female and would like a male!!! We are in london and have an appropriatly fenced yard with a pool that out pyr cannot resist in the summer!!! If meeting zues is still a possibilty you can reach me at 226 378 6641!!! Look forwad to hearing from you soon!!

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