Great Pyrenees Rescue History

The Great Pyrenees Club of Southern Ontario actively started a Great Pyrenees Rescue section circa 1990. Prior to that time, there was no formal Rescue activity in the club, but most breeders in the area took their dogs back if there were problems.

For dog rescues, Lois McIntosh of Limberlost Kennels was the person that most people went to initially when the breeder was not known or could not be located. Lois was, and still is, one the largest kennels around and is well known in the dog world, so it was natural to contact her regarding Great Pyrenees dogs in need of help. Lois is a very generous person and did not turn away any rescue dogs. However, the task and expense were becoming too great for her to take in all rescue dogs, so the club established its Rescue section to deal with the problem.

Many of our rescue dogs have festering sores, lice and ticks in addition to other sad conditions. Quite often their coats are a mess and they need extensive grooming. Great Pyrs are normally proud animals and they all seem to appreciate being brought back to a good state of cleanliness and health. It is hard but rewarding work that the club’s Rescue section is proud to do.

The Club pays the cost associated with rescue dogs and the need to have dog rescues fully examined and treated for any illness, sores etc. before they are made available for adoption. Their shots are brought up to date and they are implanted with identity microchips. In addition, if necessary each dog is spayed or neutered before placement. As you can image, this can become costly and the club, and those who so generously volunteer their time and skill, provide it all.

And what is the most important part of our history? We rescue and place approximately 35 Great Pyr Rescue dogs every year. And we do it with help from people just like you.

If you have ever considered providing a forever home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog, why not start the process now by completing our Great Pyrenees Adoption Form?

Alternatively, you could provide a temporary Foster Home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog. You can start that process by completing our Great Pyrenees Foster Form. Great Pyrenees Foster Form.

Return to our Great Pyrenees Rescue Page









Breaking News

  1. Indy

    May 02, 21 09:44 AM

    *ADOPTED* DOB: February 19, 2020 Indy is an Akbash mix. Indy needed more time than her family could give her. They made the tough decision to surrender

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  2. Charlie

    Apr 28, 21 10:06 AM

    Charlie, only 7-years-old, Hound?/Pyr mix, came to us when his owner felt that he was depressed after moving from the country to the city. She wanted to

    Read More

  3. Disinterested in Owners

    Apr 20, 21 03:59 PM

    Our 10+ year old female Pyrenees has recently become very distant and even runs from us when we try to pet her or give her a treat. We have had her since

    Read More

  4. Fecal Incontinence

    Apr 15, 21 11:52 AM

    my daughter just rescued a 7 yo male hes pooping in his sleep and while sleeping his back half will shake and at times his tail moves to please hel

    Read More

  5. Harmonius living with parent and pup?

    Apr 13, 21 09:11 AM

    We have a male and female and they just had their first litter. Is it a good ideal to keep one of their pups? Or will they fight?

    Read More

  6. Constipation

    Apr 08, 21 08:45 AM

    My PYR is two years old, I just rescued him from a bad situation, he is constipated, is this an issue with the breed or an issue specific to this PYR

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  7. Pregnant?

    Apr 05, 21 01:32 PM

    What is the lengthy of gestation for a Pyrenese? Today would be 50 days and there's no sign of weight gain or puppies showing/moving. Do these dogs take

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  8. Trust

    Apr 02, 21 08:31 AM

    A male Pyrenees showed up at my house & it’s sooo scared & timid. I’ve been feeding & water him every time I see him but he will not let me get close to

    Read More