Great Pyrenees Rescue History

The Great Pyrenees Club of Southern Ontario actively started a Great Pyrenees Rescue section circa 1990. Prior to that time, there was no formal Rescue activity in the club, but most breeders in the area took their dogs back if there were problems.

For dog rescues, Lois McIntosh of Limberlost Kennels was the person that most people went to initially when the breeder was not known or could not be located. Lois was, and still is, one the largest kennels around and is well known in the dog world, so it was natural to contact her regarding Great Pyrenees dogs in need of help. Lois is a very generous person and did not turn away any rescue dogs. However, the task and expense were becoming too great for her to take in all rescue dogs, so the club established its Rescue section to deal with the problem.

Many of our rescue dogs have festering sores, lice and ticks in addition to other sad conditions. Quite often their coats are a mess and they need extensive grooming. Great Pyrs are normally proud animals and they all seem to appreciate being brought back to a good state of cleanliness and health. It is hard but rewarding work that the club’s Rescue section is proud to do.

The Club pays the cost associated with rescue dogs and the need to have dog rescues fully examined and treated for any illness, sores etc. before they are made available for adoption. Their shots are brought up to date and they are implanted with identity microchips. In addition, if necessary each dog is spayed or neutered before placement. As you can image, this can become costly and the club, and those who so generously volunteer their time and skill, provide it all.

And what is the most important part of our history? We rescue and place approximately 35 Great Pyr Rescue dogs every year. And we do it with help from people just like you.

If you have ever considered providing a forever home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog, why not start the process now by completing our Great Pyrenees Adoption Form?

Alternatively, you could provide a temporary Foster Home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog. You can start that process by completing our Great Pyrenees Foster Form. Great Pyrenees Foster Form.

Return to our Great Pyrenees Rescue Page








Breaking News

  1. Kane

    Nov 20, 19 03:08 PM

    DOB: October 3, 2016 Kane came in with Marley. He is three-years-old and a real sweetheart. He is a big boy which is why children are not a good fit

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  2. Chance

    Nov 06, 19 07:01 AM

    DOB: April 2018 Great Pyrenees Cross He is house broken and has basic training. He is getting better on the leash and is currently walked using a gentle

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  3. Sensitive back feet

    Oct 22, 19 07:07 PM

    My Pyr is just 1 yr old. Has double dews on back feet. Sometimes, if he is running or playing, he will stop abruptly and limp for a few minutes, as if

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  4. White vs Badger

    Oct 01, 19 06:00 PM

    Which side/country of the Pyrenees Mountains produces white vs badger Great Pyrenees?

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  5. Anxiety - Jumps out windows, though screens

    Sep 29, 19 04:45 PM

    Our 4 year old male golden mix boy has historically destroyed screens by clawing at them and jumping out of windows (even second story). He was better

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  6. Chloe

    Sep 26, 19 07:43 AM

    *If you don't plan on reading the whole profile, this is not the dog for you.* DOB: April 24, 2018 Crate-trained: She may need some work on this. Chloe,

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  7. Quincy

    Sep 20, 19 07:52 AM

    We are please to announce Quincy's adoption is now final. He is a puppy who gets into mischief but with ongoing positive-reinforcement training, he'll

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  8. Training

    Sep 17, 19 07:57 AM

    I was told getting a PYR at 5 months would be a mistake , he would be difficult to train and bond with. Is this so, is there a advantage to getting a PYR

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