An Introduction To The Great Pyrenees Mountain Dog


Possessing a breath-taking beauty, a wonderful disposition, and a calm, stately bearing, the breed is completely suited to filling the role of companion and guardian of the home.

The luxuriant coat of the Great Pyr is predominantly white, with grey, black, badger and occasionally, red markings. An unusual, almost unique characteristic is the set of double dewclaws on the hind feet, which are thought to act as 'snowshoes' in the deep snow of the mountains. Adult males can weigh up to 135lbs; females up to 120lbs. For such a large dog, the Great Pyr has a very low metabolic rate, resulting in far less food consumption than for breeds of comparable size.

As a protector of the family, no breed could be more devoted, sensible and wise. It has been said, truthfully, that the Pyr's judgement of character can be relied upon absolutely. Tidy and fastidious by nature, the Pyr is easy to keep in condition, and, despite his or her size, is ideally suited to life as a family pet. To attain the best relationship between children and your dog, and to foster the dog's good nature and sound temperament, parents must educate their children as well as the new pup.

Today, Great Pyrenees Mountain Dogs are protective companions, show obedience dogs, livestock guardians and goodwill ambassadors doing therapy work in hospitals and seniors homes. If you wish to add a Pyr to your family, we strongly encourage you not to rush into it. Do your homework. Obtain a list of breeders, either from the Dogs in Canada Annual (www.ckc.ca) or from one of the Great Pyrenees clubs across Canada. To find out more about the Great Pyr visit at least three breeders in your area before you make any decision.

And of course, explore this site completely or contact us to ask any question about the breed. We are here to help make the right choice when deciding on a Great Pyr.




Short History of the Great Pyrenees

The ever-increasing interest in this beautiful and historic breed has sparked debate about its origins. Although the breed's presence in the Pyrenees Mountains is documented as far back as Roman times. It is believed that this large dog breed has existed in much the same form for at least 4000 yrs.

These magnificent dogs have been guarding flocks and herds in the Pyrenees Mountains for many centuries. Originally, the predators they warded off were wolves and bears. In Canada today however, Great Pyrs used as livestock guardians are far more likely to encounter feral dog packs and coyotes in addition to wolves and bears.

Want to learn more about the Great Pyrenees?








Breaking News

  1. Duke

    Jul 15, 18 12:28 PM

    *ADOPTED* Duke's family came to meet him, fell in love with him and took him home. They have much Pyr experience so he is in good hands. Congratulations

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  2. Hello Darling!

    Jul 12, 18 05:43 AM

    We received notice from a friend that the Greenville, SC Animal Shelter was holding a young Great Pyrenees as a rescue not available for adoption because

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  3. Pyr / Poodle / Lab cross

    Jul 11, 18 05:50 AM

    I just got a puppy Pyredoodle and her dew claws are very floppy. They aren’t like those of a regular Great Pyrenees I don’t think. They don’t seem to be

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  4. Teething trouble

    Jul 08, 18 02:03 PM

    Will a 5 month old puppy have severe swelling of his gums? Our puppy doesn’t hardly even want to eat his mouth is so swollen.

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  5. In heat - cycle

    Jul 04, 18 05:59 AM

    Our Female Great Pyrenees is no longer nursing as of a week ago. How soon can she come back into heat?

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  6. Jack

    Jul 02, 18 07:17 PM

    *ADOPTED* We are thrilled to announce that Jackie-boy's adoption is final. It took much time, guidance and patience by his new people to have him get

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  7. Seth

    Jul 02, 18 07:14 PM

    *ADOPTION PENDING* UPDATE He put on a whopping 16 pounds on his raw diet and grew a little in height since April. He's at 65 pounds. He gets very excited

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  8. Neuter - Health Risks

    Jul 02, 18 12:53 PM

    My Great Pyr is going to be 5 this August, we never had him neutered, since we had been told best to wait until 3 so he would get all benefits of testosterone

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