Great Pyrenees Rescue History

The Great Pyrenees Club of Southern Ontario actively started a Great Pyrenees Rescue section circa 1990. Prior to that time, there was no formal Rescue activity in the club, but most breeders in the area took their dogs back if there were problems.

For dog rescues, Lois McIntosh of Limberlost Kennels was the person that most people went to initially when the breeder was not known or could not be located. Lois was, and still is, one the largest kennels around and is well known in the dog world, so it was natural to contact her regarding Great Pyrenees dogs in need of help. Lois is a very generous person and did not turn away any rescue dogs. However, the task and expense were becoming too great for her to take in all rescue dogs, so the club established its Rescue section to deal with the problem.

Many of our rescue dogs have festering sores, lice and ticks in addition to other sad conditions. Quite often their coats are a mess and they need extensive grooming. Great Pyrs are normally proud animals and they all seem to appreciate being brought back to a good state of cleanliness and health. It is hard but rewarding work that the club’s Rescue section is proud to do.

The Club pays the cost associated with rescue dogs and the need to have dog rescues fully examined and treated for any illness, sores etc. before they are made available for adoption. Their shots are brought up to date and they are implanted with identity microchips. In addition, if necessary each dog is spayed or neutered before placement. As you can image, this can become costly and the club, and those who so generously volunteer their time and skill, provide it all.

And what is the most important part of our history? We rescue and place approximately 35 Great Pyr Rescue dogs every year. And we do it with help from people just like you.

If you have ever considered providing a forever home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog, why not start the process now by completing our Great Pyrenees Adoption Form?

Alternatively, you could provide a temporary Foster Home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog. You can start that process by completing our Great Pyrenees Foster Form. Great Pyrenees Foster Form.

Return to our Great Pyrenees Rescue Page








Breaking News

  1. Weight gain

    Apr 21, 17 01:58 PM

    I have a GP he's 7 months old. He is getting longer but seems that he looks so thin. Is this normal for the pups to look thinner as they shed and grow

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  2. Doggy Dementia?

    Apr 19, 17 11:41 AM

    We rescued our Pyr approximately 5 yrs ago. At the time we thought she was at least 4 yrs old. She's always been really laid back, low maintenance (except

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  3. Unattended Pyrs

    Apr 18, 17 04:38 PM

    If a GP was left alone for 18-36 hours on a large acreage property that is fenced and he has lived on for 6 months. timed food dispenser and water source

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  4. Milo got bigger taller longer

    Apr 15, 17 11:39 AM

    Milo the darling got taller by two inches and longer by two inches ( usa ). We got him May 2016. It's now April 2017 . He grew bigger. Milo was a bottlefed

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  5. Milo sleep pees but not when awake

    Apr 14, 17 05:25 PM

    Milo sleep pees but not when awake. How common is this?is it's a neutered thing? Vet sez will give proin. RX. See his sphincter relaxes when he relaxes.

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  6. Shedding!

    Apr 14, 17 05:23 PM

    I have a 10 week old pyrenees puppy who is not shedding at all. I have never owned this breed but know a little bit.I know they are supposed to shed a

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  7. Believe pets go to heaven comforts me

    Apr 14, 17 05:22 PM

    Many religious leaders including Billy Graham and the Pope believe pets go to heaven , comforts me.

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  8. Milo winks one eye

    Apr 10, 17 05:29 PM

    Milo winks one eye he observed it being done by me and my 3 cats . Either he winks first or in response to my wink. It's a big hit at the nursing home

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