Great Pyrenees Rescue History

The Great Pyrenees Club of Southern Ontario actively started a Great Pyrenees Rescue section circa 1990. Prior to that time, there was no formal Rescue activity in the club, but most breeders in the area took their dogs back if there were problems.

For dog rescues, Lois McIntosh of Limberlost Kennels was the person that most people went to initially when the breeder was not known or could not be located. Lois was, and still is, one the largest kennels around and is well known in the dog world, so it was natural to contact her regarding Great Pyrenees dogs in need of help. Lois is a very generous person and did not turn away any rescue dogs. However, the task and expense were becoming too great for her to take in all rescue dogs, so the club established its Rescue section to deal with the problem.

Many of our rescue dogs have festering sores, lice and ticks in addition to other sad conditions. Quite often their coats are a mess and they need extensive grooming. Great Pyrs are normally proud animals and they all seem to appreciate being brought back to a good state of cleanliness and health. It is hard but rewarding work that the club’s Rescue section is proud to do.

The Club pays the cost associated with rescue dogs and the need to have dog rescues fully examined and treated for any illness, sores etc. before they are made available for adoption. Their shots are brought up to date and they are implanted with identity microchips. In addition, if necessary each dog is spayed or neutered before placement. As you can image, this can become costly and the club, and those who so generously volunteer their time and skill, provide it all.

And what is the most important part of our history? We rescue and place approximately 35 Great Pyr Rescue dogs every year. And we do it with help from people just like you.

If you have ever considered providing a forever home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog, why not start the process now by completing our Great Pyrenees Adoption Form?

Alternatively, you could provide a temporary Foster Home for a Great Pyrenees rescue dog. You can start that process by completing our Great Pyrenees Foster Form. Great Pyrenees Foster Form.

Return to our Great Pyrenees Rescue Page









Breaking News

  1. A New Fan

    Aug 17, 17 07:02 PM

    We live in the country. Life flows with the rhythm of the natural world around us. It's beautiful and quiet. A new neighbour has moved in across

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  2. This is the situation, Sandra

    Aug 14, 17 02:09 PM

    I’ve started to write this several times to say what she meant to me and our rescue efforts. I just can’t seem to accept that she’s no longer at the end

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  3. Milo the annoying

    Aug 11, 17 05:13 PM

    Milo discovered how to open the cabinet and his food bin to lay on his side and gobble as fast as he can . And then fall asleep with his head in the food

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  4. House Training

    Aug 08, 17 06:09 AM

    I rescued a female Pyrenees 3 years ago when she was 3. She has bad separation anxiety. We have to crate her when we are not home or she will pee and poop

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  5. Charlie

    Aug 07, 17 04:37 PM

    DOB: Approx. May 2015 Companion dog Other dogs: One other high-ranked (confident) dog may be suitable Children: Over 10 years old Cats: Good Partial

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  6. Bella

    Aug 07, 17 04:31 PM

    *ADOPTED* Bella (now Lily) came in and went out and was adopted quickly. Belle is a very sweet girl of two years old. She has spent her short life tied

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  7. Bear

    Aug 07, 17 04:28 PM

    *ADOPTED* Update: Bear was introduced to Anne (and Izzy). He is now with Anne and settling in with her and Izzy. He is big and beautiful and all that Winnie

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  8. Neutering

    Aug 07, 17 10:18 AM

    My Great Pyrenees pup is a big boy at 12 weeks.When should I have him Castrated ??

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